How to Protect Your Privacy During the COVID-19 Outbreak


In this unprecedented time, businesses big and small are facing countless new challenges. Of these challenges, breaches of privacy are becoming more common and more concerning. Since more users are working from home, they need to be more aware of points where their privacy can be breached. We want to help you protect your privacy during the Coronavirus outbreak. We’ll explore how video conferencing, scam emails, and webcams can affect your privacy.

Millions of Americans Are Working From Home – Are There Any Security Risks?


Fast Facts

  • 71% of security professionals reported an increase in security threats or attacks since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak.
  • The leading threat cited was phishing attempts (55%), followed by malicious websites claiming to offer information or advice about the pandemic (32%), and increases in malware (28%) and ransomware (19%).
  • 61% of respondents were concerned about the security risks of having to make rapid changes to enable remote working.
  • 55% believe that remote access security needs improvements.

MSSP Alert

The new work normal

Millions of Americans are in an unprecedented situation. Specifically, Californians have been ordered by Governor Gavin Newsom to stay at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. As we normalize working from home – the thought of cybersecurity comes to mind. For example a change in routine can create new opportunities for more relaxed habits. We’ll elaborate. As workers increasingly log on from home, employees are having to merge personal technology with business devices. For employers, the concern isn’t about capacity, but about workers introducing new potential vulnerabilities into their routine — whether that’s weak passwords on personal computers, poorly secured home WiFi routers, or a family member’s device passing along a computer virus.

To point out another example, imagine a kid’s device infects the network. The same network the work from home employee is working on. Unbeknownst to the employee – the workstation has exponentially become vulnerable to whatever malicious software is on the network. As routines change, companies adjusting to remote work, and businesses testing their security systems, organizations may be a security risk.